T.R.E.E.S. Traveller's Rest Equine Elders Sanctuary
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Mona
Thoroughbred mare, age 30-ish?
 
 
Mona arrived Friday, August 7, 2009 and is presently being housed for the Orange County Sheriff's Department, pending legal action:

 

 

 

 

 

 
August 12, 2009 - Orange County Sheriff's Department was granted permanent custody of all horses involved in this case and will be turning Mona over to TREES as of today. 
 
Miss Mona is doing very well.  We started this mare on 3/4 qt of Triple Crown Senior formula + a handful of soaked alfalfa cubes, 4 times a day, with a flake of grass hay between meals.  As of today, Mona's meals have increased to 1-1/2 quarts of senior, 1-1/2 qt of soaked cubes and free choice hay.  She is also being slowly reintroduced to grass, currently hand-grazed for 10 - 15 minutes once a day.  So far, so good!
 

 
 
August 18, 2009
 
 
   
 
August 20. 2009
Mona is estimated to be 30 years old. She looks like a Thoroughbred, but is not tattooed, so we cannot age her through that means. We don't know if she was a polo pony or one of several other types of horses at the "retirement farm."

As of today, Mona continues to eat well and gain weight. We are, however, seeing signs of some respiratory difficulties. All blood tests showed normal results, leading to the conclusion she does not have a respiratory infection, so Mona will begin treatment for "heaves" or COPD today. Our current hot spell is not helping, of course, but the forecast calls for much lower temperatures this weekend. Hopefully that, and her new meds, will help Miss Mona breathe easily.
 
One other thing about Miss Mona. This mare loves people. She must have known great kindness and care in her earlier years. 
 
 
 
 
Mona, August 26, 2009
 
 
August 27, 2009
Mona had her hooves trimmed.  The farrier pointed out what he called a "fever line" near the top of the hoof, an indication that Mona may have experienced some kind of fever-producing infection some time ago.  Judging the distance from the line to the coronet band, the farrier estimated it happened approximately 12 weeks before mona was rescued by Orange Count AC, but also pointed out that a starving horse would grow hoof more slowly than a healthy horse, making that estimate potentially inaccurate.
 
Meahwhile, Mona is now enjoying three-hour grazing periods, both morning and evening, on her way to 24/7 turnout.  
 
 
September 9, 2009
 
 
September 29, 2009
   
"Freedom!"   Mona finally seems strong enough to be introduced to a group of horses in a larger field.  During her initial moments "at liberty" she seems a little unsure of the situation.  Its been a long time since she's seen an area this big.
 
 
Later the same day! (Sept 29, 2009)
 
 
 
October 4, 2009
Butt cheeks!
 
 
October 23, 2009
 
 
November 7, 2009
Senior Spa Day courtesy of the University of Mary Washington Pre-Vet Club
 
 
 
January 13, 2010
 
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